There’s no I in Change

The past 1,5 years, I’ve not only experienced the tremendous work it takes for a global company to reorganize, disrupt and innovate into a product- and technology company. I’ve also learnt what it takes from the people working there.

It’s not the new office, or the new PowerPoint templates that define a change. People do. If you don’t listen to your employees or take care of them during a change process, they will leave. If you win over the people in your organization, you have everything to win going forward with the change.

I think Schibsted Reboot Conference is a great example of getting everyone on the same page. We gathered 1400 Product and Tech employees under the same roof, letting people get to know each other, engaging in inspirational workshops and listening to talented internal and external speakers. The history, what lead up to the change, the present, what we’re going through, and the vision and goal for this change was clearly communicated.

Check out #schREBOOT on Twitter.

It’s easy to feel threatened, insecure, and uncomfortable because things are ambiguous during a change process. When these feelings take the overhand of individuals, there’s a risk they will start acting selfishly and do everything they can to shake these feelings, naturally. People feel threatened, insecure and uncomfortable if they don’t get the information they need;

  • What is going on?
  • Where are we in the process, what can I expect?
  • What do you expect from me?

change

I’m a part of a large company going through a change process, so what can I do?

Expect the unexpected

Teams change names every other week, you need to change desks every other month, new people start, other people leave; expect that things will change and do whatever it takes to smoothen the process.

Seek out information

Expect that you are under informed at all times, and that it’s expected from you to ask about what is going on. The people dealing with communication can’t read your mind, what do you want to know and what is important to you? It’s like a relationship; communication needs to work both ways.

Be solutions oriented

Things will be rocky; problems will arise, big and small. You will make huge impact if you show your problem solving skills at this stage. If you find a problem, or hear about it from your colleagues, take action and do something about it. If we can catch the problems small, it will be a much smoother ride.

See the bigger picture

You’re a part of something revolutionary! Your company is on a mission, so take a few moments during a week where you remind yourself what larger purpose you serve. What is this line of code, or this phone call worth? Whether the goal is to save the world, or revolutionize an industry, put it all together and look at the bigger picture.

Have fun!

Have kick-offs with your team, socialize and play games. You put in some hard work, make sure you have fun while doing it. Building stronger relationships with your colleagues in this phase is important. It will make you collaborate better and trust each other more if you know the other person well.

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